September 5, 2014 · 8:00pm

8:00pm
$15
21+

Tickets now available at the door only! See you soon!

It’s the return of The David Mayfield Parade, after their hot performance at Lancaster Roots and Blues Festival. Joining them will be Bombadil and  local favorites, Jake Lewis & the Clergy.

The David Mayfield Parade

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If you’ve seen David Mayfield perform with The Avett Brothers, Mumford & Sons, Jessica Lea Mayfield, or at Bonnaroo, you’ve caught the charisma, the heart, and the comedy, and it’s likely you’ll come back for more. His last album “Good Man Down” features notable guests Seth Avett, Mayfield’s bluegrass hero Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver, and country star Dierks Bentley who duets with Mayfield on Marty Stuart’s “Tempted.” Bentley remembered Mayfield from seeing his family’s bluegrass band play long before the former was a country star. That’s the thing. Mayfield isn’t easy to forget.

David Mayfield grew up playing bass and touring with his family’s bluegrass band. As a teenager he established himself as a hot picker collecting national awards for his dexterity on guitar and mandolin. His knack for colorful performances was evident as a backing player in his sister Jessica Lea Mayfield’s band including their appearance on “The Late Show with David Letterman.” He oozed personality on stage – a trait that makes him a natural frontman. He took his skills and personality when he joined the bluegrass outfit Cadillac Sky, playing sold out shows with British folk revivalists Mumford and Sons. Around then Mayfield began writing songs after hearing artists like Randy Newman and Simon & Garfunkel. Encouraged by his sister Jessica, Mumford & Sons, and other friends in music to record his original material, Mayfield released “The Parade” to much acclaim. Since that time, David Mayfield has toured almost non-stop including many appearances with The Avett Brothers both with his own Parade and sitting in with the Brothers, until taking time from the road to record Good Man Down in response to pleas from his fans for another record.

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Bombadil

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Bombadil is as much a family as a band, a collective of like-minded friends who just happen to be talented and innovative musicians and multi-instrumentalists. Like all families, they’ve had their share of ups and downs, break ups and reunions, but the long road they’ve traveled together has made their bond closer and their music more emotional and intimate.

Stuart Robinson met Daniel Michalak on a hiking trip during a pre-orientation program at Duke University in 2002. They started making music on Michalak’s laptop, playing keyboards, singing and writing songs together. In 2004, Michalak went to Bolivia as an exchange student and ran into Bryan Rahija. They’d played together in a cover band, but didn’t become friends until they met in Bolivia. After discovering they had similar ideas about songwriting, they began making demos. After hearing the band’s music, a friend suggested they call themselves Bombadil, after Tom Bombadil, the singing, songwriting character in “The Hobbit.” With Daniel’s brother John on drums, they became a quartet and put up a few newly completed songs on their MySpace page.

Dolph Ramseur, head of Ramseur Records, loved what he heard on the band’s MySpace page and caught their live show soon afterward. He was impressed by their energy and signed them. He helped them book shows, hone their sound and make records, including the Bombadil EP in 2006, A Buzz, A Buzz in 2008 and Tarpits and Canyonlands in 2009. In 2007, a Craigslist ad had turned up drummer James Phillips, a long time Bombadil fan, and he joined the band just as A Buzz, A Buzz was being completed. The band was getting rave reviews for their lively, chaotic shows and brilliant albums, which drew not unwarranted comparisons to The Beatles. Then things fell apart. Robinson said he wanted to leave the band and Daniel Michalak was slowly losing the use of his hands due to his neural tension condition.

By the time Tarpits and Canyonlands was released, Robinson had quit and the band was on hiatus, hoping Michalak’s hands would heal enough for him to play music again. Next, John Michalak left to go to medical school. It looked like the end of the line, but the call of the muse was too strong to resist. On his own, Robinson had been writing songs and asked Michalak and Rahija to help him flesh out his ideas. Rest and therapy helped Michalak regain the use of his hands, and the reborn quartet moved into Pendavavis Farm near Portland, OR (where the Decemberists recorded The King Is Dead), to record All That the Rain Promises. They toured sparingly to support the album, but with the band whole and healthy, and Metrics of Affection recorded and ready for its July 23 release date, Bombadil is back, on tour and intent on fulfilling their dream of writing great songs and touching people with their powerful stage show.

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Jake Lewis & the Clergy

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Jake Lewis & the Clergy are an indie rock band from Lancaster, PA. Formed in 2013, after frontman Jake Lewis had clocked a few years as a solo performer, WXPN has called the collaboration “a Philly local band to watch” and “a wonderful example of the talented artists that deserve to be heard.”

“After Loudon [Wainwright III] I headed over to the Lizard Lounge at the Chameleon Club to check out Jake Lewis and the Clergy, a band that was just nominated for a Tri State Indie award. I never saw them live before and they blew me away. Their music is memorizing and the harmonies are beautifully written. It was a very small intimate performance and I’m happy that I got to see them up close and personal, because it’s only a matter of time before this band takes off.” – Tri State Indie

“As a kid growing up in Gettysburg, Jake Lewis was surrounded by history— and family. Adopted at birth, he was one of eight adopted children growing up together on their Adams County farm. Now the folk-indie musician has found that family, history, and place inform his craft, from the exploration of personal history in his songwriting to the recording of his latest album, Gossip, in a Prohibition-era cabin in Lititz. Lewis’ sound has also grown, from the quiet acoustic sets he did as a solo musician to the more raucous shows he plays now with The Clergy.” – Fig Magazine

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