February 23, 2018 · 8:00pm

8:00 PM, An Sibin
Tickets: $10
21+

 

Patrick Coman

In an era where volume dictates attention, Patrick Coman pulls you in with a quiet unshakable confidence. It’s a confidence built from a decade behind the scenes with some of the generation’s best songwriters as a booking agent, sound engineer, and DJ/producer for premier Americana station WUMB, before stepping into the spotlight with his debut full length album Tree Of Life.
Turning his back on a career in the music business to spend his time as a stay at home father by day and full time musician by night has paid dividends for Coman as a writer and performer. Over the past year he’s opened for a crop of revered Americana artists like Del McCoury, Robbie Fulks, Larry Campbell & Teresa Williams, Joan Osborne, and John Fullbright, and veteran musicians have taken him under their wing, including celebrated blues guitarist Peter Parcek and drummer Marco Giovino (Robert Plant, Buddy Miller) who co-produced Tree Of Life and helped to bring in notable musicians to fill out the band like bassist Joe Klompus (Letters to Cleo), organist Tom West (Peter Wolf, Susan Tedeschi), and the “Beehive Queen” Christine Ohlman, who lends her unmistakable grit to the spirited duet “Don’t Reach”.

Coman’s own vocals bear the laidback blues-inflected style of fellow Tulsa, OK natives JJ Cale and Leon Russell, while the protagonists in “The Judge” and “Trouble #2” bring to mind that other towering figure of Oklahoma music Woody Guthrie. The 12-song album (11 Coman originals and a cover of Leon Russell’s “Magic Mirror”) also stirs in touches of Lou Reed’s street walkin’ strut, the swampy groove of Little Feat, and darkly humorous rockabilly rave ups that swing like demented versions of Sun Studios classics.

Nearly all of the material was written in the months leading up to and directly following the birth of Coman’s first child. With a new baby in the house, songs were pieced together late at night or early in the morning in that mystical twilight period where dreams and reality blur. This cosmic bridge is reflected in the album’s title and sequence, where haunting opener “Heartbeat” beckons the listener into this eerie dreamlike landscape, before galloping across a fun house mirror version of Americana that reflects back in ways that seem both familiar and strange.In an era where volume dictates attention, Patrick Coman pulls you in with a quiet unshakable confidence. It’s a confidence built from a decade behind the scenes with some of the generation’s best songwriters as a booking agent, sound engineer, and DJ/producer for premier Americana station WUMB, before stepping into the spotlight with his debut full length album Tree Of Life.

Turning his back on a career in the music business to spend his time as a stay at home father by day and full time musician by night has paid dividends for Coman as a writer and performer. Over the past year he’s opened for a crop of revered Americana artists like Del McCoury, Robbie Fulks, Larry Campbell & Teresa Williams, Joan Osborne, and John Fullbright, and veteran musicians have taken him under their wing, including celebrated blues guitarist Peter Parcek and drummer Marco Giovino (Robert Plant, Buddy Miller) who co-produced Tree Of Life and helped to bring in notable musicians to fill out the band like bassist Joe Klompus (Letters to Cleo), organist Tom West (Peter Wolf, Susan Tedeschi), and the “Beehive Queen” Christine Ohlman, who lends her unmistakable grit to the spirited duet “Don’t Reach”.

Coman’s own vocals bear the laidback blues-inflected style of fellow Tulsa, OK natives JJ Cale and Leon Russell, while the protagonists in “The Judge” and “Trouble #2” bring to mind that other towering figure of Oklahoma music Woody Guthrie. The 12-song album (11 Coman originals and a cover of Leon Russell’s “Magic Mirror”) also stirs in touches of Lou Reed’s street walkin’ strut, the swampy groove of Little Feat, and darkly humorous rockabilly rave ups that swing like demented versions of Sun Studios classics.

Nearly all of the material was written in the months leading up to and directly following the birth of Coman’s first child. With a new baby in the house, songs were pieced together late at night or early in the morning in that mystical twilight period where dreams and reality blur. This cosmic bridge is reflected in the album’s title and sequence, where haunting opener “Heartbeat” beckons the listener into this eerie dreamlike landscape, before galloping across a fun house mirror version of Americana that reflects back in ways that seem both familiar and strange.

Visit his website and facebook for more information!

Liz Fulmer

Liz Fulmer is a primarily self-taught singer/songwriter based out of Lancaster, PA. She studied songwriting at Berklee College of Music and left Berklee in 2010 to pursue her own career in New York City, frequenting a variety of stages from the grungy National Underground in Soho to the renowned Metropolitan Room. Here, she transitioned from piano to guitar and began writing more lyrical, folk music. Craving experience and moved by the traveler’s itch, Liz spent the next few years traveling through New Zealand and the UK, spending the most time in Edinburgh, Scotland. Liz contemplated a career change in 2014 but was given a boost of confidence from Lady Gaga after the Grammy winner saw Liz perform an original song. Since the chance encounter, Liz has been in the studio working on her first EP, Tall Tales, due for a Spring release. Liz’s music is highly lyrical and springs from a hybrid of pop and folk influences.

Visit her website and facebook for more information!

 

Chris Kauffman

 

About once every 10 years or so, Chris Kauffman emerges from the regularity of his normal life to release a new full-length project. In 1997, with his young, Lancaster, PA based indie band, Riveredge he and his bandmates delivered an interesting and eclectic album called “Plaid”.

Ten years later, fully engaged in family life and the new joys of fatherhood he released an album called “Know You” which met with some critical success. Performing around the Pennsylvania area under his own name he was able to enjoy playing many low-key acoustic shows, which matched the timbre and mood of the acoustic-folk-rock of “Know You”.

Also at this time he began playing with a group of friends in a band called Waiting for Cadence which gave his material a bit more of an indie-rock edge to it. Waiting for Cadence never released a full-length album, although a number of smaller E.P. recordings are in circulation.

Now, in 2017, Chris has found that fatherhood is a catalyst in his search for what is true and real and good. No longer content with just accepting everything as we know it, Chris began giving in to his natural, questioning character and began to tear apart long-held beliefs piece by piece. Love, political beliefs, religion, church, and societal norms were all fodder for this deconstruction. Sometimes Chris has found that what he believed all along could indeed stand up to the test of questioning, and in these cases his faith and his values were strengthened. Conversely, sometimes he found that what he once held to be true could no longer hold weight, and in these instances he needed to rebuild or even throw out what he once held as sacred.

The Deconstructionists is what follows.

Born out of the eternal search for what’s true, and the desire to pass on to the next generation only the things that can stand up to questioning, “The Deconstructionists” contains 12 honest songs that chronicle the difficult process of tearing apart one’s deeply engrained mindsets. Accompanied by some of his Waiting for Cadence bandmates (Joe Stauffer, Joel Meck, and Dan Carpenter) and others, Chris takes the listener on a journey through the deconstruction process and, in some cases, back out again. Sonically dense on purpose, the listener should hear new things with each listen. Borrowing vibes from late 80’s/early 90’s alternative music as well as from the current indie and Americana scenes, Chris has created a layered sound that is interesting and unique. Cliches have no place in these writings as The Deconstructionists attempt to use words in new ways to describe the age-old search for truth.

Visit his website and facebook for more information!