August 1, 2014 · 8:00pm

Show 8pm
$17
21+

Online ordering for this show is no longer available. Please purchase your tickets at the door.

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XPN Welcomes Langhorne Slim & the Law to Tellus360! Joining them will be Andrew Combs and Joe Fletcher.

Langhorne Slim & The Law

Langhorne_Slim_Todd_Roeth_1 There is nothing like the challenges and camaraderie of the road to inspire a songwriter who thrives upon the emotional energy and exhilaration only travel can deliver. Some singers are devoted to the pursuit of perpetual motion, and Langhorne Slim releases his wild soul in ways that come out of the discipline of live performance. The 13 songs that compose Langhorne Slim & The Law’s new “The Way We Move” are road-tested, rollicking and very rock ‘n’ rolling tunes that the songwriter perfected with his loyal band, and come out of the kind of good times and bad experiences that songwriters of Langhorne’s lofty stature can turn into life-affirming rock ‘n’ roll. You could also call what Langhorne Slim does folk music, but then there’s his sly, charming and open-hearted feel for pop music — those summertime melodies that nudge you into a grin even when the song is about something bad. For Langhorne Slim — Pennsylvania-born self-taught guitarist who moves to Brooklyn at 18, begins feeling out his place in a burgeoning punk-folk scene, wends his way to the West Coast, and finds himself celebrated from Newport to Portland as one of today’s most original singers and songwriters — “The Way We Move” represents the sound of a band devoted to living in the moment. Riding the success of his 2009 full-length Be Set Free, Langhorne went through some changes over the last three years — he lost his beloved grandfather, who is the subject of the new record’s moving “Song for Sid,” and moved on from a relationship that had lasted five years. And there was the physical moving — the literal side of the record’s title. Pulling up stakes from his home of two years, Portland, Ore., Langhorne also has been touring non-stop with The Law. As he says, “I’m in a bit of a transitional period — currently, the road will be home. That’s just kind of my spirit, to be slightly restless.” Perfecting their rangy sound out on the endless grey ribbon, Langhorne and The Law — bassist Jeff Ratner, drummer Malachi DeLorenzo and banjo player and keyboardist David Moore — went down to rural Texas in the summer of 2011 to work on new material. With some 30 tunes to consider, the quartet soaked up the Lone Star sunshine and developed arrangements and approaches for Langhorne’s latest batch of songs. Jeff Ratner had joined the group at the time of Be Set Free, and brought on multi-instrumentalist David Moore not long after. Moore and Ratner go way back, having moved to New York around the same time, and they’ve played together in what Jeff estimates are 15 bands. Langhorne’s association with Malachi is equally deep. As the group played together through tours with the Drive-By Truckers and the Avett Brothers, and made appearances at the Newport Folk Festival and Bonnaroo, their bond became ever stronger, their music more confident. This is what you hear on “The Way We Move” — forward motion meeting deep cohesion, all in the service of Langhorne’s amazing songs and compelling vocals. “We wanted Langhorne’s songs to shine, and be as raw as the creatures that we are,” Jeff says of the recording process. The band set up in the Catskill, N.Y. Old Soul Studio, a 100-year-old Greek Revival house retooled for recording. With studio owner Kenny Siegal co-producing, Langhorne & The Law fearlessly ran through an astounding 26 songs in four days, with Langhorne putting finishing touches on new tunes as they recorded. Langhorne says it was an intimate affair in Old Soul, with Moore’s “banjo room” in a coatroom and the piano in the living room. It comes through on “The Way We Move” — the live feel of the sessions, which found Langhorne singing along with the band on every track. “Singing with the band that way, it’s almost like I was performing on stage,” he says. Cutting everything live to tape gave the band exactly what they’d been looking for: a super-charged evocation of their raucous, friendly stage performances. Langhorne and Jeff value in music for its rawness, and it doesn’t matter whether that rawness — the insurgent spirit that unites the Clash and Charlie Poole — comes from in punk, country, soul or folk. Langhorne is a fan of Porter Wagoner, Jimmie Rodgers, Waylon Jennings, and early rock ‘n’ roll in general. But there’s nothing referential or detached about the music Langhorne & The Law make. Langhorne writes songs that are yearning, sad, happy, defeated and optimistic, with hints of ’50s rock ‘n’ roll balladry. “We all love Wu-Tang Clan as much as we love Bowie, or Brazilian psychedelic pop,” Langhorne says. On “The Way We Move,” David’s probing piano often provides focus for Langhorne’s tales of love and loss. “On the Attack” begins with a delicate, watercolor section that turns into an ingenious variation on a classic soul ballad — Solomon Burke meets punk blues in a smoky folk club. Langhorne addresses it to a current or past love. Similarly, “Past Lives” sports a piano introduction that gives way to a melancholy 6/8 ballad that perfectly supports lyrics about possible past lives and their interaction with the present. It’s a spirited, inspired slice of real rock ‘n’ roll — exuberance meets hard-won experience in an explosive combination. David’s banjo and Malachi’s walloping drums add up to a new kind of folk music. The music drives, but there’s no loss of subtlety. And when the group lays into the garage-rocking “Fire,” with its funky electric piano and supremely callow lyrics about first kisses and the hot-burning passions of adolescence, it’s clear Langhorne is one of the great rock ‘n’ rollers of our or any time. Road-tested as the band is, the new music also shows just how far Langhorne Slim has come as a singer. He croons, exults and sings the blues throughout “The Way We Move.” And there are his lyrics, which are about strange dreams featuring women who want him dead even as he desires them, the pressures of small-town life, ambition, and how much he appreciates his mother’s love and support. That’s all Langhorne and his life — his mother, he says, really was amazingly supportive of his ambitions to become a musician, as was the rest of his family. It comes through as you listen to his virtuoso demonstration of a singing style that seems alive to every fleeting emotional shade of meaning. Langhorne puts you in mind of John Lennon’s singing from time to time — it’s nothing exact, and Slim doesn’t do much music that is very Lennon- or Beatle-esque, but it’s something in the timbre, and the openness of his vocals. It’s worth repeating here that Langhorne learned Nirvana songs as he began to explore the guitar and songwriting, and Kurt Cobain’s intense singing is another reference point. But these guys don’t play the reference game, and like to keep it raw. The new record moves in ways that are fresh for Langhorne Slim & The Law, and demonstrates all the ways we can go forward while keeping an eye on the mirror. They’re laying down the law. It’s very American, and when Langhorne Slim contemplates whether or not he fits in to any narrow-cast definition of this country’s music, he replies with a perfect, laconic joke: “I think we fit in most places that would take us.” FaceBook icon Twittindex 

Andrew Combs

While the last of the great ‘70s Nashville and Texas songwriters are a fading memory, the fire and precision of their words and melodies have to come again somewhere in our modern age. Enter Dallas-born, Nashville-based Andrew Combs, whose songs are rendered in the same stark and understated terms as those forefathers of the great tradition of Texas writing. Andrew Combs is part of a Nashville renaissance in folk music that stems from the slicked-up rural country gems of Justin Townes Earle and the close-knit indie folk-rock of Caitlin Rose. Maybe you’d even stumble on to Combs and his band getting uncharacteristically fuzzed-out and wild at a hipster house party. Or maybe you’ll see Combs solo — on stage and alone as all hell — singing songs that have prompted middle-aged women to ask him, “Are you gonna be alright?” Well, the Texas lad is just fine, thank you, and we think you’ll agree when you hear more of the sounds that are coming out of this East Nashville hotbed of dusty country soul, done up right. Andrew Combs’ Website | Andrew Combs’ Facebook page | Andrew Combs’ Bandcamp page

Joe Fletcher

JoeFletcher copy Joe Fletcher & the Wrong Reasons is an Americana band that began in Providence, RI in 2005. In the center of this revolving cast of musicians, songwriter Joe Fletcher remains at the helm of this country blues-based outfit while still playing many solo acoustic shows throughout the land every year. Sometime in 2007, the band recorded their debut album BURY YOUR PROBLEMS at the rather mysterious Golden Monkey Studio in the heart of Providence’s Smith Hill neighborhood. Details of this event remain murky though it has been corroborated that sound experts Jay Berndt and Matt Oliva oversaw a assortment of musicians which included legends Jack Hanlon, Greg “J.D.” Burgess, Dennis Kelly, and Dale Cunningham. We do know that the record received overwhelmingly positive reviews and Fletcher’s story-driven songwriting began catching national attention earning comparisons to Cash, Cave, Cohen, and Dylan. After a series of lengthy U.S. tours in support of Bury Your Problems, Joe Fletcher & the Wrong Reasons released their sophomore effort WHITE LIGHTER in December 2010. This time they entered the illustrious Machines With Magnets Recording Studio in Pawtucket, R.I. with a cast that included local luminaries Scott Boutier, Jack Hanlon, John McCauley, Alec Redfearn, Damien Puerini, Dave Lamb, MorganEve Swain, Lily Costner, and Tyler Hayden. Following the recording of White Lighter, rhythm kings Dave Hemingway (drums) and Joe Principe (upright and electric bass) joined the organization, and guitar hero Damien Puerini stayed on in the lead role. White Lighter has attracted a whole new level of attention to the band. Most notably, No Depression has championed the band, saying that “Joe Fletcher proves his versatility on White Lighter. His signature brand of dark and lyrically driven honky tonk is interspersed with a softer side that would make Hagg or Jones proud.” Known best for their thrilling live show, Joe Fletcher & the Wrong Reasons have shared stages with many of their favorite acts including Deer Tick, The Low Anthem, Shooter Jennings, John Doe, Robert Earl Keen, The Supersuckers, Lydia Loveless, Murder by Death, Scott H. Biram, Holly Golightly, Slim Cessna’s Auto Club, Brown Bird, and The Devil Makes Three. Their wide variety of material and influences make them equally at home in a small café or a sold-out rock club. Twittindex