Hello dear Public Recordeers,

We’ve got a saucy subject for this week’s album of the week.  Rather than just hitting you with a single piece, we’re unveiling a brand new section albeit a small one initially.  For the past year, The Public Records has been collecting ‘adults only’ albums in all sorts of genres.  Now, granted, there was never a massive dearth of these kinds of albums, but there are enough to make a decent collection.

America has never shied away from censoring music; however, we’re not going to be dealing with political censorship or censorship concerning violence in this section.  No, our newest edition to the shelves will be a much more light hearted sort of no-no, this one’s all about s-e-x.  Without further ado, let’s get into our NSFW section:

Doug Clark & His Hot Nuts – Rush Week (Gross Records, 1964); Doug Clark & His Hot Nuts formed in Chapel Hill, North Carolina in the late 1950s/early 1960s.  They were an R&B novelty band known for playing clubs and campuses.  The record label Jubilee picked them up and created the Gross label just for them.  They were a noteworthy in getting younger middle class white audiences into R&B and blues and with a more than fifty year career they were a major influence on contemporary artists ranging from Ol’ Dirty Bastard to Too Short.

Pearl Bailey sings for adults only (Roulette Records, 1959); Pearl Bailey was a Broadway actor and singer with 5 decade career laden with awards and accolades.  She was born in Virginia in 1918 and her career began in the 1930s in Philadelphia.  Most of her work was wholesome; Broadway, television shows, and albums; however, in through the late 1950s to early 1960s she released several albums of suggestive songs from her nightclub and Broadway days.

Various – Copulating Rhythm: blues and jazz rarities vol.1 (Jass Records, 1986);  This one is a real treat!  This album is a compilation of old dirty jazz and blues tunes from the 1930s featuring some very big names such as Sonny Terry, Memphis Minnie, Big Bill Broonzy.  A fantastic collection of risqué tunes from the early 20th century will bring you right into the barrel house!

The Johnny Otis Show, Live! ft. Leroy Daniels – Sexmouth (Laff Records, N/A); Here we have an excellent example of adult only standup from some of the godfathers of R&B and comedy. Johnny Otis was a the epitome of showman – a radio and TV star, singer, songwriter; he was responsible for starting the careers of many famous names from Etta James, Big Momma Thorton, Hank Ballard, and The Coasters.  Leroy Daniels was a comedian and actor who got his start as an LA shoeshine boy.  He developed a rhythmic technique that quickly catapulted him to fame by the age of fourteen.  He then began working with Redd Foxx and soon struck out on his own.  In this live album, Leroy Daniels delivers hilarious bawdy tales with the backing of Johnny Otis.

Rusty Warren – Sin-Sational (Jubilee Records, 1961); Called ‘The Mother Of The Sexual Revolution’, Warren was born in New York City in 1930 and was adopted by a Massachusetts family.  After graduating from the New England Conservatory Of Music for piano under the tutelage of Boston Pops Orchestra‘s Arthur Fiedler in 1954 she began performing in clubs in the region.  She then transferred her act to the southwest to Phoenix initially before finally making a home for herself in Las Vegas where her revolutionary act revolved around the subject of sex from the female perspective.

Belle Barth – My next story is a little risqué.’ (After Hours Records, 1961); Belle Barth was born in New York in 1911. As a Jewish comedian she began her career playing the ‘Borscht Belt’ series of hotels and resorts in the Catskill mountains of New York.  She then got married and moved to Miami Beach and continued performing in clubs there and travelling to New York and Chicago to do shows.  In 1953 she was arrested and fined $25 for her act.  After that case, people would continue to try to sue her with a pair of school teachers asking for $1.6 million dollars for ‘harming their health and corrupting them morally’; they were all thrown out by the judges.  She was discovered by producer Stanley Borden who signed her to the After Hours record label.  This led to skyrocketing fame with Carnegie Hall midnight shows and gigs at Caesar’s Palace.  She opened her own spot Belle Barth’s Club in the Coronet Hotel in Miami Beach.

We hope you enjoy all these important albums that help challenged and kept our first amendment going strong and if they offend your sensibilities…good!

All these albums are meant to be had with cock………..tails.